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Students Operate With Robot in Simulated Lab

A group of Irvington High School students participated in a two-night robotics surgery program at White Plains Hospital’s da Vinci Robotics Lab from Jan. 28-29. They worked alongside medical professionals, learned how robotics is incorporated into surgery and participated in a hands-on simulated lab experience.

“I am so appreciative to have taken part in the White Plains Hospital robotic surgery program,” sophomore Kira Gabriel said. “It allowed me to learn more about how the use of robotics, specifically the da Vinci Xi, are revolutionizing operations and transforming the future of medicine, allowing surgeons to operate with immense precision.”

During the first day of the program, the students met with a robotics surgeon and a nurse practitioner to learn about the history of medicine. On the second day, the students dressed in scrubs and entered the operating room, where they took turns working at the console simulator to control the movements of the robot’s arm.

“After completing the program, I gained clarification regarding my future career in medicine,” Gabriel said. “Since I have always contemplated the option of pursuing the field of medicine and surgery, being able to learn more about the future of the evolving medical industry and the dynamic changes that are taking place was an important tool in guiding my decision.”

Max Forte, a junior, said he appreciated learning about the future of surgery and how new machines are being created to facilitate the betterment of surgery.

“Robots are able to stabilize the shaking of someone’s hand, perform surgery in smaller places and create a more comfortable environment for the surgeon,” he said. “Through my two-day journey, I was able to experience all the factors of robotics surgery, while learning some helpful tips on surgery itself, all under the care of an amazing staff at White Plains Hospital.”

The students were provided with the unique opportunity through a partnership between Irvington High School and White Plains Hospital. Geri Winterroth, a biology teacher and Science Research Program adviser, volunteered to support the students during the program.

“They were able to see the various career paths open to them, so many more than just a few years ago,” Winterroth said. “The students were enthusiastic and eager to learn. We are fortunate to have these young people; they are our future.”

Principal Juliet Gevargis-Mizimakoski said she was proud of the students and grateful to have strengthened and expanded the school’s partnership with White Plains Hospital.

“This year, we were able to have twice the number of IHS students participate in this incredible learning opportunity,” Gevargis-Mizimakoski said.